Archive for the 'Lindsay Lohan' Category

Celebrity English

June 29, 2006

Celebrity Grammar has a new home!

Please visit the new site: Celebrity English | Grammar Examples.

Learn both grammar and vocabulary from the stars at Celebrity English!

Lindsay and an Error in Punctuation

May 24, 2006

Lindsay Lohan will appear in two movies that deal with an assassination; playing a groupie attached to John Lennon in "Chapter 27" and an activist in a fictionalized account of the killing of Robert F. Kennedy.

This sentence contains an error in punctuation: a semicolon is used in place of a comma.

A semicolon should only be used to separate two independent clauses. This sentence contains one independent clause and a participial phrase. A partcipial phrase should be separated from an independent clause by a comma.

Use a semicolon alone when two independent clauses are related to each other ("None of my friends wanted to see that band; I went to the concert alone.") or with a conjunctive adverb (however, moreover, therefore, consequently, otherwise, nevertheless, thus) to form a transition between two independent clauses ("None of my friends wanted to see that band; therefore, I went to the concert alone.")

This is how the sentence should be punctuated:

Lindsay Lohan will appear in two movies that deal with an assassination, playing a groupie attached to John Lennon in "Chapter 27" and an activist in a fictionalized account of the killing of Robert F. Kennedy.

Lindsay and an Error in Parallelism

May 14, 2006

Lindsay Lohan was on The Ellen DeGeneres Show on Thursday, promoting her new movie, doing more push-ups, and said "Oh, #&%!" on the air.

This sentence is incorrect because it contains an error in parallelism. There are two gerund phrases ("promoting her new movie" and "doing more push-ups") and one verb phrase ("said 'Oh, #&%!' on the air".) To correct the sentence, change the verb phrase to a gerund phrase.

Lindsay Lohan was on The Ellen DeGeneres Show on Thursday, promoting her new movie, doing more push-ups, and saying "Oh, #&%!" on the air.